Making Gardening Your New Year’s Resolution

Was your resolution to do more in the garden this year? One of the best ways to see-through a resolution is to do it with other people. Including the family in your garden activities can be a great way to connect with your family and also ensure that your resolution goals get met at the same time. Even if you’re not a gardener now, there are things you can do now, with your family, to do more in the garden and even grow some healthy food this year.

Of course, in Australia, the new year coincides with some of the hottest months so you have some time to wait before you can really get stuck into gardening. But even in the hotter weather there are things you can do to plan and prepare. You could do some yard and garden bed preparation now, but there’s a month or two to consider your gardening goals, before the seasons change, and you need to take action.

The amount of space you have for your garden will determine what you can do in the garden.  The time you can allocate to gardening will be your other crucial factor. If you only have a balcony, then you’ll need a lot less time to build and maintain your garden than if you have a large quarter acre block with a full backyard. Regardless of how much space you have; there are options that will allow you to have a rewarding gardening experience.

Investing in a garden can be simple and inexpensive. You don’t have to grow food if you don’t want to, you may choose ornamental flowers, or ones that attract birds, bees and butterflies. And when it comes to plans, there are many options to choose from.

Try involving your family in the planning – choose what you’d like to grow – together –  and make a list. Do some research based on your climate, to work out which things will grow best in your garden.

You can keep kids interested by giving them some special responsibilities in the garden and perhaps even a small garden, or set of pots, just for them. Growing simple plants like herbs can offer them excitement and quick rewards because they can observe herbs sprouting almost immediately. If they quickly feel connected to an outcome then they’ll be more likely to maintain interest in the garden for longer.

Once you know what you want to grow, you need to get some seeds or seedlings. Try your local seed savers chapter for some unusual organic varieties. Local members of seed savers or a gardening club can help you select the right types of varieties for your climate. The other way you can grow of course, is to get some seedlings from the local nursery. This will give you plans that you can start tending immediately… another great options to get the kids hooked.

Your local garden centre is a good place to start to get advice.. you can also look in hardware warehouses like Bunnings these often have seedlings for sale in their garden section.

The most important thing with starting a new garden is to make it fun and engaging. Get everyone involved, set up some roles and responsibilities and try to make it fun for everyone. The less it feels like a chore, the more kids will love getting out in the sunshine and fresh air.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *